Mrs. Diaz was consulting for acne for Aliyah, her 27-year-old daughter.  Aliyah, a bright young woman, is very athletic, according to her mom.  She loves gymnastics and swimming, which is why she is slim. She had always wanted to be a nurse so she studied in one of the colleges offering the said course while staying in a dormitory.

Everytime Mrs. Diaz visited her, she noticed Aliyah was getting heavier and heavier.  She also noted pimples showing up on her baby’s face, but she thought it was just part of growing up.  But when she came home after several months more, Mrs. Diaz was alarmed to see Aliyah’s face full of acne, her hair greasy and she was really fat, with tiny hairs starting to grow all over her body. She said this had all developed over several months, even though her diet or lifestyle had not changed.  Aside from these changes, Aliyah also complained of having painful, heavy, very irregular periods which made her skip class.

Mrs. Diaz took Aliyah to see a skin specialist, who prescribed various tablets and creams, which really didn’t do much to help the situation. Her doctor sent her to a dietitian who said she needed to lose weight.  Aliyah was also advised to go slow on sweets and carbohydrates to improve her acne.  Since her hair still looked normal at that time, nothing was done to improve on it.

Many more months passed, and  Aliyah complained of being unwell, feeling tired and cold most of the time, listless and with no energy.  Mrs. Diaz also noted that Aliyah was more temperamental and depressed most of the time. That was when Mrs. Diaz decided to visit me.  We checked Aliyah’s blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature --all of which were low.   

I told Mrs. Diaz to consult an obstetrician-gynecologist for Aliyah’s irregular menstruation and to call me when they are already with their OB.  A scan confirmed the presence of the typical “string of pearls” cysts in the ovaries, which are consistent with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS).   Aliyah is currently co-managed by myself and her obstetrician. I just started her on her acne regimen. 

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is a common hormonal disorder that affects five to ten-percent of women.  It refers to the multiple, mini “cysts” which form in the ovaries of some women who suffer from the condition.  These cysts are actually egg sacks or follicles that instead of growing, fail to mature and  to ovulate (or the failure to release an egg) as they normally would.  That is they stall, instead releasing relatively higher male hormones (androgens) into the blood, causing a range of health problems.

It is a condition marked by an imbalance of female sex hormones which then causes an array of symptoms affecting the menstrual cycle, fertility, skin, and hair, and even puts
women at risk for health problems such as diabetes.

Women with PCOS do not react normally to insulin.  When sugars hit their blood stream, their body requires extra insulin to process the sugar (women with PCOS do not process carbohydrates properly).  Higher levels of insulin have several effects in different areas of their body, including messing with their ovaries. The insulin molecule is very similar in shape to another molecule that has receptors in the ovary. Insulin then falsely attaches to the ovary, causing it to release too much male hormone, leading to unwanted skin and hair changes (that is, ovaries produce excess androgens producing male characteristics like deepening of the voice and male hair distribution).  The extra male hormone gets converted to excess estrogen in the fat cells, which prevents ovulation.  Estrogen is the hormone responsible for creating the blood and nutrient-rich lining of the uterus.  A normal amount of estrogen makes a healthy lining for an embryo to implant. With PCOS, there is an elevated level of estrogen, creating excess tissue, leading to heavy, crampy periods. In extreme untreated cases, it can lead to precancer of the uterus.  This explains, too, why one of the biggest concerns about PCOS is that having babies might be a struggle. The excess insulin makes weight loss more difficult, too, leading to obesity.  Patients struggle with their weight. It’s not for lack of trying but more because their insulin quickly stores carbohydrates as fat and makes it difficult for them to lose it.

The symptoms of PCOS are pretty rough to deal with and can make a patient feel unattractive.  Patients usually lose some of their scalp hair (androgenetic alopecia) but increase hair growth in other body parts (that is, hirsutism, which is the most common complaint). Their skin also develops several changes.  They develop moderate-to-severe acne, seborrhea (similar to dandruff), pigmentary problems like acanthosis nigricans (dark patches of the skin with thick velvety texture which may be a sign of a more serious health problem, such as prediabetes). It’s that darn testosterone and insulin actually.  Since many of the manifestations include the skin and hair, patients with PCOS are usually seen first by a dermatologist and then co-managed by an ob-gyne, too.  Other manifestations are: early development of pubic hair (before eight in girls and before nine in boys); boil-like lumps in the armpits, groin, and under the breasts; persistent oily skin and acne; skin tags in the armpits, under the breasts or in the groin; diabetes mellitus, especially likely in obese patients; high blood pressure; elevated body fats; cardiovascular disease, especially coronary artery disease.

source: Philippine Star
http://www.philstar.com/health-and-family/2016/10/04/1629935/when-your-hormone-becomes-problem

PUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN- When asked how Unilab Foundation engages their stakeholders to support their advocacies, Ms. Rhodora Palomar-Fresnedi, Unilab Foundation Executive Director, emphasized the importance of “craft, curate, and communicate” during her presentation for the Health Research Communicators Meeting on 9 August 2016 at Citystate Asturias Hotel.  

According to Fresnedi, knowing what story you want to tell is crucial in engaging stakeholders. In crafting a story, one should consider the possible reasons why people would want to hear a story. Likewise, one should be certain of the change that he/she wants his/her audience to make.

You can’t build a community if no one can associate with your conflict,” Fresnedi emphasized. To connect with their audience, Fresnedi cited that all programs of Unilab Foundation are research-based. 

To curate a story, Fresnedi advised to create a communication experience that will enable the people to become story tellers of their own.

Kapag maganda ang istorya, if you build the experience, hindi niyo na kailangang mangimbita [ng mga tao], sila ang pupunta sayo,” she explained. The message becomes positive when people write from the heart, she added.

Another aspect to consider is communicating the message. In every research, the researcher should identify his/her target audience, ways to reach them, and means to measure his/her success on engaging them. The researcher should have robust communication, foundation, and structure, Fresnedi explained.

Tell a story so compelling, others would want to write about it,” she ended.

The Health Research Communicators meeting is one of the pre-events of the 10th Philippine National Health Research System (PNHRS) week celebration. With the theme “Research and Innovation for Health and the Environment,” the 10th PNHRS Week provided a platform for interaction, learning, and collaboration of different stakeholders in health research and development. 

PUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN- “Ethnic groups worldwide are not exempted from the consequences of the changing environment,” thus emphasized during the session on Indigenous Health System and Environmental Pressures last 10th Philippine National Health Research System (PNHRS) Week celebration on 10 August 2016 at Citystate Asturias Hotel.

According to Dr. Jaime Montoya, PNHRS Lead Coordinator and Philippine Council for Health Research and Development (PCHRD) Executive Director, ethic groups are highly dependent on natural resources for survival. They are also vital in helping to improve the resilience of our ecosystem.

“[However] several environmental pressures such as habitat change, pollution, climate change and over-exploitation of resources greatly affect their way of life, especially their health,” he said.

Speakers of the session include Dr.  Isidro Sia of Philippine Institute of Traditional and Alternative Health Care (PITAHC), Ms. April Grace Ortega-Liao of Palawan State University (PSU), Mr. Juanito Guarde of Department of Education-Naujan South District, and Atty. Erwin Caliba of the National Commission on Indigenous Peoples.

 

Sia discussed ways on “Building Resilient Indigenous People’s Health and Food Systems Through Agro-ecological Principles and Practices” through his introduction of the rich culture and biodiversity of the country and indigenous knowledge and practices of the IPs towards the environment.

Ang pangangalaga sa kalikasan ay pangangalaga rin sa tao, sa buhay at sa kalusugan,” he emphasized.

Liao and Guarde shared their experiences on engaging with Tagbanua and Mangyan groups, respectively.

Liao discussed how Tagbanuas survived the changing environment through their health practices such as diday-diday, their habit of taking a break from working to protect their bodies. Likewise, Guarde, a Mangyan himself, stressed that they are happy and healthy people and contented with what they have.   

Caliba talked about the rights of indigenous cultural communities as stated in the 1987 Philippine constitution, citing  that ethic groups have rights to ancestral domains/lands, self-governance and empowerment, social justice, and cultural integrity. Likewise, he explained that all activities or researches to be done at the ancestral domain should have free and prior informed consent (FPIC).

PNHRS is an integrated national framework for health research which aims to promote cooperation and integration of all health research efforts and stakeholders in the country. For more information, visit its website at healthresearch.ph.

Local health researches, both by students and professionals, were recognized in the recently concluded 10th Philippine National Health Research System Week Celebration in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan last August 10-11, 2016.

MHRDC Executives award Certificate of Recognition to Mr. Joener Bangero, 1st Place winner, Student Research Presentation,

during the Awarding and Closing Ceremonies of the 10th PNHRS Week Celebration in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan. | Photo by Athena Verdey - DOST MIMAROPA

 

The study, “Efficacy of the Mosquito Repellent Spray of the Crude Extract from the Leaves of Alpinia elegans (Tagbak) against Aedes aegypti”presented by Giselle Padilla of the Our Lady of Fatima University bagged the 1st place award in the 2016 DOST-PCHRD-Gruppo Medica Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Thesis in Herbal Medicine.

Student-researchers from the Western Visayas State University (WVSU) – College of Medicine earned 1st place during the Student Research Competition for their study on the positive effects of bee venom in reducing colon cancer cells. WVSU – College of Medicine also bagged the 1stprize in the poster category for the study, “In Vitro Evaluation of Anti-Staphylococcal, Anti-Cervical Adenocarcinoma, and Anti-Hepatocellular Carcinoma Activities of Aqueous, Butanol, and Chloroform Fractions of Durian (Durio zibethinus) Ring Methanolic Extracts.” 

The study “Detection and Sequential Enrichment of Glycopeptides and Phosphopeptides as Cancer Biomarkers by Functionalized NH2/ZIC HILIC-type Magnetic Nanoprobes” by Dr. Rey Capangpangan of Caraga State University was declared the 1st prize winner for the Professional Research Competition. Researchers from Saint Mary’s University and University of the Philippines - Manila won 2nd and 3rd prizes, respectively. Angeles University Foundation and Pampanga State Agricultural University bagged the 1st prize in the professional poster category for their study on the anti-hyperglycemic properties of ethyl acetate from “kundol” leaves.

The Western Visayas Health Research and Development Consortium won 1st place in the Best Consortium Poster Competition.

Here is the complete list of winners awarded during the 10th PNHRS Closing Ceremonies last August 11, 2016:

2016 DOST-PCHRD-GRUPPO MEDICA AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING UNDERGRADUATE THESIS IN HERBAL MEDICINE

PROFESSIONAL RESEARCH COMPETITION STUDENT RESEARCH COMPETITION
Paper Presentation Poster Presentation Paper Presentation Poster Presentation

1st Place:

Efficacy of the Mosquito Repellent Spray of the Crude Extract from the Leaves ofAlpinia elegans (Tagbak) against Aedes aegypti

Giselle P. Padilla, FA. Quetua, SJA. Tapaoan, KD Tropicales, and JT Yambao

Our Lady of Fatima University

1st Place:

Detection and Sequential Enrichment of Glycopeptides and Phosphopeptides as Cancer Biomarkers by Functionalized NH2/ZIC HILIC-type Magnetic Nanoprobes

Dr. Rey Capangpangan

Caraga State University, CARAGA

1st Place:

The Anti-hyperglycemic Properties of the Ethyl Acetate, and Hexane Extracts from Kondol Leaves (Benincasa hispida Cogniaux)

Bella G. Panlilio, MB Lacson, CA Arbotante, CS Bacani, Carmela B. de Leon, JV Villanueva, E. Gutierrez-Ariola, and NC Tunguilut

Angeles University Foundation & Pampanga State Agricultural University

1st Place:

In Vitro Cytotoxic Effects of Bee (Apis mellifera) Venom in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Lines

Joener Bangero, DK Calise, LJ dela Pena, F Delos Reyes, E Documento, V Durana, AK Faculin, PKM Ong, RL Pueblo, NA Roldan

Western Visayas State University – College of Medicine

1st Place:

In Vitro Evaluation of Anti-Staphylococcal, Anti-Cervical Adenocarcinoma, and Anti-Hepatocellular Carcinoma Activities of Aqueous, Butanol, and Chloroform Fractions of Durian (Durio zibethinus) Ring Methanolic Extracts

Noel C. Salvoza, AS Alonzo, RKD Ba-aco, N. Bacalango, JV Bacallan, XH Cardos, GG Garibay, JB Javier, BCE Pescasiosa

Western Visayas State University – College of Medicine

2nd Place:

Characterization, Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activity Screening of Fucoidan from Bal-Balulang (Hydroclathrus clathratus)

Gene Rhode F. Pantig (presentor), KJE. Manalon, PPS Laggui, DCL Guantia, PL Cortez, and RS Balane

Centro Escolar University

2nd Place:

Isolation of the Cytotoxic, Angiogenic, and Antitumor Compounds from Trichaleurina celebica

Claribel Matias

Saint Mary’s University – Nueva Vizcaya

2nd Place:

The Efficacy and Safety of Spirulina Supplementation in the Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Preschool age Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Ma. Rosita S. Quitola

Department of Pediatrics, Mariano Marcos Memorial Hospital and Medical Center

2nd Place:

Tomato Paste Lycopene as an Anticoagulant

ME Ramos, J Zamuco, A Alcantara, CS Casusi, MA Reyes, AG Dela Cruz, JE Matias, D Miguel, EJ Narciso, and E Oda

Saint Louis University – Baguio City

2nd Place:

Isolation and In Vitro Characterization of Adipose Derived Stem Cells From Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout ( Rodentia: Muridae)

Norman Quilantang, VM Ybanez, C Pulvera, R Bacabac, and  F Edillo

University of San Carlos- Talamban Campus

3rd Place:

Antifungal Cream from the Volatile Oil of the Leaves of Mayana (Plectranthus scutellarioides (L.) R. Br.)

Marielle Jian C. Aspa , CMM Arguelles, and MCM Amatorio

University of Perpetual Help-Dr. Jose G. Tamayo Medical University

3rd Place:

Factors Contributing to Maternal Deaths in a Referral Hospital in a Philippine Province:  A Modified Three-Delay Model

Dr. Amiel Nazer Bermudez

University of the Philippines – Manila

3rd Place:

Screening of Mentha cordifolia Opiz Buffer Crude Extract as a Putative HIV-1 Post-translational Protease Inhibitor

Alfredo A. Hinay Jr., Lilen Dorothy C. Sarol

Medical Laboratory Science Program, University of Immaculate Conception, Davao City

3rd Place:

Screening for Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Alipinia galanga against Acetic-acid Induced Colitis in Mice (Mus muculus)

Diomerl Edward Baldo and Jocelyn Serrano

Bicol University

3rd Place:

The Effect of Iodized and Sea Salt Used as Control Agents for Mosquito Larvae in the Top Four Barangays in Cagayan de Oro City with Highest Dengue Incidence

Mark Archibald D. Balindong, AD Beltran, KK Caballes, AC Cabugwason and GSS Lescano

Liceo de Cagayan University

BEST CONSORTIUM POSTER

Western Visayas Health Research and Development and Consortium

 

 

PUERTO PRINCESA, PALAWAN- When asked how Unilab Foundation engages their stakeholders to support their advocacies, Ms. Rhodora Palomar-Fresnedi, Unilab Foundation Executive Director, emphasized the importance of “craft, curate, and communicate” during her presentation for the Health Research Communicators Meeting on 9 August 2016 at Citystate Asturias Hotel.  

According to Fresnedi, knowing what story you want to tell is crucial in engaging stakeholders. In crafting a story, one should consider the possible reasons why people would want to hear a story. Likewise, one should be certain of the change that he/she wants his/her audience to make.

You can’t build a community if no one can associate with your conflict,” Fresnedi emphasized. To connect with their audience, Fresnedi cited that all programs of Unilab Foundation are research-based. 

To curate a story, Fresnedi advised to create a communication experience that will enable the people to become story tellers of their own.

Kapag maganda ang istorya, if you build the experience, hindi niyo na kailangang mangimbita [ng mga tao], sila ang pupunta sayo,” she explained. The message becomes positive when people write from the heart, she added.

Another aspect to consider is communicating the message. In every research, the researcher should identify his/her target audience, ways to reach them, and means to measure his/her success on engaging them. The researcher should have robust communication, foundation, and structure, Fresnedi explained.

Tell a story so compelling, others would want to write about it,” she ended.

The Health Research Communicators meeting is one of the pre-events of the 10th Philippine National Health Research System (PNHRS) week celebration. With the theme “Research and Innovation for Health and the Environment,” the 10th PNHRS Week provided a platform for interaction, learning, and collaboration of different stakeholders in health research and development. 

Subcategories

Featured Links

PNHRS

http://www.healthresearch.ph

PCHRD

http://www.pchrd.dost.gov.ph

eHealth

http://www.ehealth.ph

Ethics

http://ethics.healthresearch.ph

ASEAN-NDI

http://www.asean-ndi.org

Events Calendar

February 2018
S M T W T F S
28 29 30 31 1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 1 2 3